Print

Breakfast Sausage: 5 stories to read today

Published by Mike Pound on .

The arraignment mug shot of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who has been charged with leaking grand jury testimony and lying about it in court. (Associated Press)The arraignment mug shot of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane, who has been charged with leaking grand jury testimony and lying about it in court. (Associated Press)

1) Pennsylvania Attorney General and accused criminal Kathleen Kane will meet with media types on Wednesday, to tell us her side of the story behind the charges – including obstruction, oppression and perjury, which is a felony – that she leaked grand jury testimony and then lied about it in court. We'd say we're expecting a Nixonian performance, except that Richard Nixon had the sense to resign.

2) It took no less than a personal telephone call from Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes for Donald Trump to call off his scorched-earth campaign against the network and host/playground bully Megyn Kelly, who hurt Mr. Trump's feelings by asking him mean questions during last week's debate.

3) The Beginning of the End, Part 1: You say you were an employee of the Rick Perry campaign? Congratulations! You're now a volunteer instead.

4) The Beginning of the End, Part 2: Ted Cruz to Rand Paul supporters: C'mon over – Rand's ship is sinking a lot faster than ours.

5) This will be worth watching: We have our first guilty plea in the cases connected to FBI raids earlier this summer in Reading and Allentown.

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Rendell to chair McGinty's Senate campaign

Published by Mike Pound on .

Pennsylvania Gov.-elect Edward Rendell announces at a press conference in Philadelphia the nomiantions of Kathleen McGinty, left, for secretary of the Department of the Enviromental Protection and David Sanko for to direct the Pennslvania Emergency Management Agency, Saturday Jan 18, 2003. (Associated Press)Pennsylvania Gov.-elect Edward Rendell announces at a press conference in Philadelphia the nomiantions of Kathleen McGinty, left, for secretary of the Department of the Enviromental Protection and David Sanko for to direct the Pennslvania Emergency Management Agency, Saturday Jan. 18, 2003. (Associated Press)

Katie McGinty will get help from an old boss as she seeks the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate.

Ed Rendell will serve as Ms. McGinty's campaign chairman, her campaign announced ths morning.

"I am glad that Katie McGinty answered the calls from across Pennsylvania for her to enter the race for U.S. Senate," the former governor said in a statement. "I encouraged Katie to run because she's a problem solver who knows how to get things done. Middle class Pennsylvanians will have a senator who will fight for good schools, good jobs, and affordable health care in Katie McGinty."

Ms. McGinty served as secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection during Mr. Rendell's tenure as governor. She recently resigned from her post a chief of staff for Gov. Tom Wolf to enter the Senate race.

"It is an honor to have Gov. Rendell as the chair of my campaign. He knows how to win tough races and I appreciate his support and encouragement," Ms. McGinty said in a statement.

 

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Debate sausage: 5 things to read about the first GOP debate

Published by Mike Pound on .

Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)Ten Republican 2016 U.S. presidential candidates, (L-R) New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, Dr. Ben Carson, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, businessman Donald Trump, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator Rand Paul and Ohio Governor John Kasich, debate at the first official Republican presidential candidates debate of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign in Cleveland, Ohio, August 6, 2015. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

Whew. For a first effort, that was fun. And no one can say Fox News took it easy on its favored candidates.

1) How did Donald Trump do? That depends. He's a lousy debater, if we judge him as we'd traditionally judge a candidate in this setting. But remember that the rules for Mr. Trump are different; if a candidacy is about anger and volume, the candidate needs only anger and volume -- and not so much responses of substance -- to be successful.

2) We propose a trade: For the next debate, let's get Carly Fiorina on the primetime stage in place of Rand Paul.

3) Jeb Bush will continue to be a GOP frontrunner simply because he has more money available than anyone else -- with the exception of Mr. Trump, of course -- but his attempt to be the grownup of the debate came off flat.

4) Four years ago, the Republican presidential candidates spent a year trying to out-conservative each other, taking the party on a sharp turn to the right. And once he was nominated, Mitt Romney found himself in an impossible position -- he was a moderate who had to be so conservative in the primaries that he was essentially unelectable, in an election where a moderate Republican probably could have taken the White House from a weakened Barack Obama. That appears to be happening again ... unless John Kasich is able to sustain the momentum that took him from his late entry to one of the last spots in the primetime debate Thursday night. Kasich's responses were consistently closer to the center than the rest of the men who shared that stage, and he had a human touch that most of the other candidate lacked.

5) Debates are often more about theater than they are about facts. Want to know who came closest to being truthful and whose pants are on fire? PolitiFact tracked the claims of the candidates and assembled this stream of social media refutations.

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Criminal charges set up conflict between Kane, Wolf

Published by Mike Pound on .

Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman speaks during a news conference Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in Norristown, Pa. Ferman announced charges against Attorney General Kathleen Kane, of leaking secret grand jury information and lying about her actions under oath. (Matt Rourke/Associated Press)Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman speaks during a news conference Thursday, Aug. 6, 2015, in Norristown, Pa. Ferman announced charges against Attorney General Kathleen Kane, of leaking secret grand jury information and lying about her actions under oath. (Matt Rourke/Associated Press)

As promised, state Attorney General Kathleen Kane was charged in Montgomery County with multiple counts of obstruction of justice, official opression, perjury and contempt of court. And Gov. Tom Wolf isn't happy about it.

All the details -- including copies of the relevant court documents -- are provided here by our Karen Langley. But we wanted to note a couple of specific points.

1) Statement, in part, from Ms. Kane: "I look forward to the opportunity to present my case in a public courtroom and move beyond the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that has defined the process to this point. Meanwhile, I remain committed to leading the Office of Attorney General and doing the job the citizens of this Commonwealth elected me to do. A resignation would be an admission of guilt and I'm not guilty."

2) Statement, in part, from Mr. Wolf: "She is entitled to her day in court. She is entitled to due process under our system of government and law, and she will have time to defend herself, and I think she needs to do that. But in the meantime, I am calling on her to step aside, step down as attorney general, because I think she cannot do what she has to do as the top law enforcement officer in Pennsylvania while she's facing these serious charges."

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Print

Breakfast Sausage: The 'Let's Debate' Edition

Published by Mike Pound on .

1) Over three hours this evening, all 457 candidates seeking the 2016 Republican presidential nomination will get a chance – albeit a brief one – to make an impression on the American voting public. And while the actual primary elections are still months away, a poor performance in tonight's debates could start a quick slide towards an early exit. Face time will be precious – whether we're talking about the kids' table debate at 5 p.m. or the main event at 9 – so look for the candidates to be sharp and concise. Unless you're frontrunner Donald Trump; in that case, you just want to continue to be louder than everyone else.

2) Scoring points during the debates will be tough, especially if you're the candidate who considers himself to be the campaign's designated adult. Jeb Bush could set himself apart tonight with a calm, thoughtful performance. But he needs to be careful: off-the-cuff Jeb Bush sometimes doesn't work so well.

3) We're not the only ones having fun with notion of the kids' table debate, but the second-tier candidates have an interesting opportunity. They don't have to share a stage with Mr. Trump, so a smart performance at 5 p.m. might work out better than a middle-of-the-road performance at 9.

4) State Attorney General Kathleen Kane could face criminal charges later today for allegedly leaking grand jury documents and lying about it in court. Ms. Kane has steadfastly maintained her innocence, even insisting she wouldn't resign if charged.

5) Meet Robert Gray. He's from Terry, Mississippi. He's a truck driver. Oh, and he's also the state's Democratic nominee for governor.

Join the conversation:

To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.