HARRISBURG — An effort by Senate Republicans to oust embattled Attorney General Kathleen Kane through a little-used provision of the state Constitution fell short this afternoon, with supporters of removal winning a majority of senators but not the two-thirds needed.
Gov. Tom Wolf toured several elementary school classrooms in Clairton this morning, including a music class where students were singing a song about being Valentines.
The January snowstorm that left hundreds stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Somerset County behind a crash of tractor-trailers overwhelmed the state’s responding crews and blanketed side roads that might have been used to divert traffic, turnpike officials told state lawmakers this morning.
Gov. Tom Wolf will try again to enact a severance tax on natural gas production in Pennsylvania, but it plays a much smaller role in the spending plan he is promoting this year.
Gov. Tom Wolf is proposing several new taxes to raise an estimated $2.7 billion in new revenues. Among them:
I. A Commonwealth in crisis
HARRISBURG — With his first Pennsylvania budget still unfinished, Gov. Tom Wolf on Tuesday delivered a combative second budget address, telling Republican legislators that if they won’t send him a sound proposal, they should find a different job.
HARRISBURG — A day before Gov. Tom Wolf was set to deliver his budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year, legislators were still squabbling over continued spending for this year.
BEDFORD, N.H. — Jeb Bush’s lawn signs outnumber Hillary Clinton’s by 20-to-1 in this rural Republican town, but that didn’t discourage U.S. Sen Bob Casey, D-Pa., from campaigning here for his fellow Democrat on Sunday.
Democrat Josh Shapiro will announce the support of three East End Democrats today, part of building a case that he’s not just a law-and-order candidate running for state attorney general.
Democrat Josh Shapiro will announce the support of three East End Democrats today, part of building a case that he’s not just a law-and-order candidate running for state attorney general.
Pittsburgh City Council on Wednesday will discuss whether money collected from metered parking after 6 p.m. in nighttime entertainment areas should be reinvested into those communities in public safety and public works resources and capital improvements.
HARRISBURG — Eleven weary months later, Gov. Tom Wolf is about to deliver a second budget proposal that he says will narrowly focus on boosting school funding while raising taxes to pay for automatic cost increases.
A hearing to determine whether a McKeesport city councilman with a felony criminal record should be allowed to assume his seat was continued Friday.
HARRISBURG — The state Supreme Court on Friday rejected a request by Attorney General Kathleen Kane to immediately reinstate her law license, and the top Senate officer responded that the chamber will vote on her removal.
HARRISBURG — The budget proposal Gov. Tom Wolf will present Tuesday will include two mergers intended to save money and improve the service of related missions.
HARRISBURG — The director of the Public Employee Retirement Commission says that Gov. Tom Wolf’s suggested reassignment of the commission’s review of municipal pension plans could cause state aid payments to go out late or incorrectly.
Angry that a weekend confrontation between police and two men in Wilkinsburg resulted in the death of a police dog and one of the men, a group of community activists today is starting an online petition calling for restricting the use of police dogs.
Pat Toomey endorsed his fellow Republican senator Marco Rubio for president Wednesday afternoon.
HARRISBURG — Gov. Tom Wolf has signed a bill that would delay requiring students to pass the Keystone exams in order to graduate.
Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration is imposing new temporary limits on the number of vacant staff positions that can be filled at state agencies under his jurisdiction as a way to curtail spending, at least until a complete state budget is adopted.
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Surprise! Funny or Die launches fake Trump film

Published by Mike Pound on .

funnyordietrump

If you've found yourself drifting off into a neverland where the words President Trump actually sound plausible, you'll want to visit the video comedians at Funny or Die as soon as possible. They've released a fake movie about The Donald, based on his book "The Art of the Deal." 

Our Maria Sciullo has the story about the 50-minute video, which was a secret until it was released earlier today. And you'll find the full thing right here.

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Perry on Politics: Finding parallels in 1972

Published by James M. Perry on .

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump speak to supporters following their wins in Tuesday's New Hampshire primaries. (Todd Heisler/The New York Times; David Goldman/Associated Press)Sen. Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump speak to supporters following their wins in Tuesday's New Hampshire primaries. (Todd Heisler/The New York Times; David Goldman/Associated Press)

Just a few weeks ago, 17 candidates were seeking either the Republican or Democratic nominations for president. After Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, won in convincing fashion by Republican Donald Trump and newly minted Democrat Bernie Sanders, that number has been whittled down to four or five Republicans and two Democrats.

Has there ever been as wild and unpredictable an election as this one?

Maybe 1972, when, in the beginning, there were 18 candidates (Nixon, Muskie, McGovern, Lindsay, Jackson, Wallace, Humphrey, Kennedy, Bayh, Chisholm, Harris, Hartke, Hughes, McCarthy, Mills, Yorty, Ashbrook and McCarthy).

One of them, George Wallace, running as a Democrat, was shot and badly wounded in a shopping mall in Maryland.

Some of them had no business running. Sam Yorty, inept mayor of Los Angeles, bumbled around New Hampshire in the "Yortymobile," touting his endorsement by William Loeb and his arch-conservative Manchester Union-Leader. Vance Hartke was the junior senator from Indiana. Birch Bayh was the senior senator and, together, they were called "Bayh and Bought."

There were some parallels to this year's race. "Put Wallace in some 1972 Democratic primaries," Kevin Phillips said in one of his columns, "and it would be the best political show in years." Mr. Wallace, he said, "would drive the fashionable Establishment nuts with his gutsy populist attacks." So, too, Donald Trump.

Sen. George McGovern of South Dakota was basically a one-issue candidate, a liberal deeply opposed to the tragic war in Vietnam. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is pretty much a one-issue candidate too, deeply opposed to the power of Wall Street and the plight of middle- and working-class Americans.

Almost everyone's favorite to win the 1972 Democratic New Hampshire primary with at least half the vote was Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine, and he did win the primary, but with only 46 percent of the vote. So the celebration was all about Mr. McGovern, who finished second with 37 percent. He said it was a "moral victory."

Mr. McGovern, it turned out, was too liberal, and his timing was bad, for the Watergate scandal was just unfolding by Election Day, when he was easily defeated by Richard Nixon. .

Is Mr. Sanders, like Mr. McGovern, too liberal to win the nomination and be elected president? He was after all a self-proclaimed socialist until last year, when he registered as a Democrat. Is Mr. Trump too outrageous, like Mr. Wallace, to win the big prize?

Neither Mr. Trump nor Mr. Sanders is interested in moral victories. They might actually win, unless voters, acting so far like spoiled children, ask themselves questions like these: Do you really want Mr. Trump appointing Supreme Court justices? Do you really want Mr. Sanders as commander-in-chief?

James M. Perry, a prominent veteran political reporter, contributes regular observations to post-gazette.com. Mr. Perry was the chief political correspondent of The Wall Street Journal until his retirement. Prior to that, he covered national politics for the Dow Jones weekly, The National Observer.

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Mean John has a ... Fetterman ... and a smile

Published by Mike Pound on .

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Mean Joe Greene in 1979.

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Mean John Fetterman in 2016.

The resemblence is uncanny, right? Mean Joe's commericial is one of the most successful bits of television advertising ever, the winner of a 1979 Clio award as one of the best TV ads of the year.

We're not certain that the remake made by the campaign of Mr.  Fetterman, the mayor of Braddock who is seeking the Democratic nomination for Pat Toomey's U.s. Senate seat, will quite measure up to those standards, but it has garnered more than a quarter million views in the 24 hours since it was released on Facebook, the campaign announced this afternoon. We're guessing it has something to do with the second T-shirt at the end of the spot.

Thanks, Mayor John!

 

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Just so we're clear

Published by Mike Pound on .

So, Marco Rubio: Do you think Barack Obama knows what he's doing?

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Breakfast Sausage: 5 things to read today

Published by Mike Pound on .

 Rick Santorum during a Republican presidential debate hosted by CNN at the Venetian in Las Vegas, Dec. 15, 2015. Santorum and Sen. Rand Paul. of Kentucky both ended their presidential campaigns on Feb. 3, 2016, as the fallout from the Iowa caucuses continued to winnow the Republican field. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times) Rick Santorum during a Republican presidential debate hosted by CNN at the Venetian in Las Vegas, Dec. 15, 2015. Santorum and Sen. Rand Paul. of Kentucky both ended their presidential campaigns on Feb. 3, 2016, as the fallout from the Iowa caucuses continued to winnow the Republican field. (Ruth Fremson/The New York Times)

1) Four years ago, Rick Santorum was the insurgent presidential candidate, winning a tight Iowa race over Mitt Romney and taking 11 other states before bowing out. This year, it seems as though Mr. Santorum has been out-conservatived by Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio and out-blustered by Donald Trump; he shut down his campaign Wednesday evening.

2) We're not surprised that Rand Paul also closed down his campaign after a poor performance in Iowa. But unlike Mr. Santorum, Mr. Paul was at one time considered to be a favorite to win the Republican nomination. It never seemed that Mr. Paul was enough of a libertarian to win over the large, enthusiastic base assembled by his father's presidential runs, and he wasn't conservative enough to attract support from the most vocal side of the Republican Party.

3) Republican U.S. senators from Pennsylvania old and new love Mr. Rubio; he picked up endorsements Wednesday from Sen. Pat Toomey – who seems to be staking out a claim with the party's establishment for his own re-election run – and from Mr. Santorum, who had some difficulty this morning nailing down the specifics behind his enthusiasm.

4) It didn't last long. Mr. Trump seemed to be actually gracious in his short speech accepting defeat Monday night in Iowa – and that was apparently all the grace he could muster. The real The Donald has surfaced on Twitter and elsewhere since, saying Mr. Cruz committed fraud to win the GOP caucuses and demanded that he be declared the winner. Huh – sounds like it's tough being a loser, right Mr. Trump?

berniesyearning

5) It's bound to be the most delicious endorsement we're going to see in 2016. It probably shouldn't be a surprise that Vermonters Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield – you probably know them as ice cream guys Ben and Jerry – are backing the candidacy of Bernie Sanders; besides the geographic connection, the pair has famously supported many progressive causes over the years. And as they have done in the past, there is ice cream involved; Bernie's Yearning is mint chocolate chip, but "all the chips have somehow ended up at the top in one huge slab— just like what happened with most of the financial gains since the end of the recession," Mr. Greenfield wrote in a promotional email. The ice cream, produced by Mr. Cohen and paid for by Mr. Sanders' campaign, will be available to those who enter contests at berniesyearning.com or at a site run by fundraiser Act Blue on behalf of Democracy for America, a progressive PAC founded by Howard Dean.

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